A Paradox?

NOTE (22FEB2016): Today, we mark the anniversary of the birth of George Washington (1731-1799). Actually, he was born on the 11th of February, but the colonies switched calendars from Julian to Gregorian; thereby, advancing the date of his birth.

“As a very important source of strength and security, cherish public credit. One method of preserving it is to use it as sparingly as possible;” -George Washington’ Farewell Address (1796)

How does ObamaCare correspond to that directive of the Father of these United States of America? How can we employ a system of medical delivery that does? How can we protect the future of our youth, who represent the future of this nation now on fire?

“Life outside society would be solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short.” -from Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679)

What can be more important to an individual than life and health? In that regard, what single advance most has improved the human lot — for the individual and for society? Sewage.

Ah, but what about medicine? Has it, too, not improved the human lot? Yes, for the individual. For society? Yes — and no.

It may seem paradoxical that a physician would give such an answer. It is not.

The well being of society depends upon the overall health of its truly creative and truly productive members. The goal of Public Health is to have maintained the health not of the individual but of the society, as a whole. Sewage has done more to fulfill that goal than any other, single measure. Moreover, the cost:benefit ratio had been enormously favorable.

In contrast, the goal of Medicine is to have relieved the suffering of the individual as a consequence of disease and trauma. All well and good until one looks at the cost:benefit ratio. It has become dreadfully unfavorable.

The average American now expends half the cost of his medical care during his entire lifetime during the last year of his life — a year in which kindness often becomes cruelty — a year that, from the perspective of society, typically is pathetically uncreative and unproductive; from the perspective of the patient, typically is progressively enfeebling and painful; from the perspective of family and friends, typically is unrelentingly burdensome and depressing.

You might comment, “Wait! In these United States of America, the individual has no obligation to be either creative nor productive. We are not Nazi Germany where the individual exists for the State. Here, the State exists for the individual — doesn’t it?”

Even so, does the individual have the right to rob his productive neighbor to pay for his own medical care, the end result of which will be of no use to that neighbor or to society and likely of little use, if any, to family, friends, and himself? If so, what are the limits of such theft?

Should the individual be paying with his own money, he very well may be entitled to the most expansive and expensive care that he can afford. Is he so entitled when it is his productive neighbor who is paying — and paying involuntarily via taxes collected by the government at the point of a gun if need be?

When medical care is limited to basic care at a primary level — especially of acute medical problems such as fractures and infections — the cost:benefit ratio becomes tolerably favorable. When medical care is expanded to advanced care at a secondary level — especially of chronic medical problems among the elderly, problems  such as non-healing wounds; failing hearts; and, worst of all, dementias — the cost:benefit ratio becomes intolerably prohibitive as witnessed by Medicare/Medicaid well on the way to bankrupting this declining nation now of fire. Once having bankrupted the nation, Medicare/Medicaid will leave precious little medical care for any but the richest.

You might ask, “There must be some humane alternative between callous disregard and misguided ‘humanitarianism’, mustn’t there?”

Fortunately, yes. The alternative is a medial system that delivers care universal but affordable, partially governmentally funded, provided by the private sector under medical supervision, acceptable to insurance companies, and scientifically based and scientifically driven.

For a description of such a system of medical delivery, see Chapter 17 in the semi-fictional novel, Inescapable Consequences. It is drawn from a detailed plan initially presented in the non-fictional book, Healthcare Reform D.O.A., nominated for two, national awards by The American Risk & Insurance Association — an academic arm of the American insurance-industry.

Americans need not be saddled with the ill-conceived ObamaCare favored by the socialistic, irresponsible Democrats nor the hodgepodge of misguided proposals by the feckless, inconsistent Republicans. The choice really is theirs. It is yours.

Choose selflessly and wisely, and your grandchildren will bless you. Choose selfishly and foolishly, and your grandchildren will curse you.

In order to comment, you must be registered with WordPress.

Tags: , ,

Comments are closed.